Main Street Succession plan

Does your Main Street have a Succession Plan?

Main Street Succession plan

Succession Plan for Main Street

Look down the Main Street of home towns across the US and you will see that small local entrepreneurs make up the majority of businesses. They have passion for what they do, they are resilient during tough times and they contribute more to the economy then big business. In the U.S. there are 28 million small businesses that make up 54% of all U.S. Sales (Source: SBA.gov).  But there is a bigger issue right now and that is the changing of the generations!

11,000 people a day are reaching age 65
(Source: social security administration)

With 11,000 Baby Boomers reaching retirement age every day we need to have a plan in place to continue these small businesses that make our communities thrive!  Of course, because of better health care and longer lives some are working past 65 but we still need to get the next generation up and running before it’s too late.

There are 2 more issues that are causing problems with Main Street Succession plans.

  • Only 45% of new businesses survive the first 5 years (Source: Kaufmann Foundation for Entrepreneurship).
  • Schools are not preparing kids for the business world. Kids have so much pressure to go to a 4 year college and it is so competitive that they are spending their time taking honors classes so that they can get into the college of their choice that they don’t have time for business electives.

Your community can be part of the solution by proactively providing programs to help develop young entrepreneurs in your communities.

What are the benefits?

  • Helping kids realize that entrepreneurship is viable career option increases the chances that they may start a business of their own.
  • Helping develop The Next Gen of entrepreneurs helps build a pipeline for your Main Street Succession Plan.
  • Providing a young entrepreneur program will educate the families on the existing businesses in the community and the economic development challenges the community faces; deepening the connection and engagement with parents and kids in your community.
  • By asking entrepreneurs to be a guest speaker, provide a field trip location for the program, or even become a mentor; you will be building community between businesses and the families in your community.
  • Providing a youth entrepreneurship opportunity in your community can connect school learning to the real world. This gives kids who might not otherwise see a purpose in what they are learning become more motivated to succeed both academically and personally.

So how does our community get started?

  • You need a champion – you need someone that wants to take this on as an initiative. It might be one person or a group of people – but without that push it probably won’t take root.
  • Decide what type of program you want to hold. You can start out as simple as a one day entrepreneurship day (could even work with the school), to a day camp, an afterschool or Saturday morning program.  Then schedule and reserve a venue.
  • Determine your goals including the number of kids, time frame, what you want to teach them and what is their end product (For example in our basic program our end products are an oral presentation to the class, a poster presentation to friends and family and a lemonade stand that raises funds for the youth entrepreneurship scholarship fund).
  • Find the tools you want to use and what your budget is to spend. The good news is there are tools out there for use and some of them are free.
    1. The SBA.gov website has an entire section dedicated to Young Entrepreneurs https://www.sba.gov/tools/sba-learning-center/training/young-entrepreneurs
    2. There are several free downloads on the eseedling website including the free e-book “You’re Never too Young to Start a Business” (including free worksheets) when you sign up for the mailing list. eseedling.com
    3. You can also check out the More Than a Lemonade Stand curriculum and Biz Ops Game that has been used with over 300 kids ages 9 -14. http://eseedling.com/lemonade-stand/
  • Find instructors; once you know what you want to teach and what tools you are going to use, you need to find instructors. The good news is there are probably business owners who would love to help by sharing their expertise.  Ask them if they would like to teach a short lesson on a business topic.  Or you may want to hire an instructor at least for the first year.
  • Market to your community. Luckily filling a youth entrepreneur program has never been an issue for me and I’m sure it won’t be for you either. Most schools will allow you to create fliers that they can hand out. Local grocery stores and libraries had bulletin boards to post and the chamber usually has a newsletter that will post it for you.

Most of all, Have FUN!  Being involved in a youth entrepreneurship program for the past 10 years has been a wonderful and rewarding experience.  It’s a fun way to teach kids about business and you will be amazed at what the kids come up with and how much they can learn in just a short period of time.

If you are still hesitant about starting a program, I would love to answer any questions you might have.  You can contact me at juliewood@eseedling.com.

Julie Ann Wood has been teaching kids about entrepreneurship fo

r over 10 years, she has created the More Than a Lemonade Stand curriculum and the Biz Ops Game to help others integrate entrepreneurship and business in their programs. In addition to working as an Education Program Manager at the UW-Madison Small Business Development Center for the past 12 years, she runs E-seedling, LLC specializing in cultivating tomorrow’s entrepreneurs through training, consulting, youth entrepreneur camps, tools and curriculum. To learn more visit www.eseedling.com

7 Steps to Get Your Kids Started as a Young Entrepreneur

                      

Parents with kids

Parents with kids

                                                                                                                                                 1. Choose a business idea. Kids can’t start learning about how to start a business if they don’t have an idea. Have them think about their hobbies, interests, what they’ve learned, what they have experience in, what they’re good at what they like to do in your spare time and then choose one or two ideas to move forward with.

2. Test your idea with potential customers. Entrepreneurs take risks but they can limit how much risk they take by testing their ideas. Have them ask potential customers, and friends and family questions about their ideas. They can start with whether or not it is a good solution to the problem they are solving and would they pay money for it. Then be sure to narrow it down to one idea to work on.

3. Create a memorable brand and plan marketing & sales activities. A brand is what a prospect or customer thinks of or feels when they hear the business name or see their logo, marketing materials or store. Once they create their brand they need to plan how to get the word out. This will be determined by budget where customers are located.

4. List what is needed to start the business and figure out the costs. Start-Up Items are the items needed to start a business. Some examples of start-up items include office supplies and equipment, website, and tools to make the product or provide the service.  Then they will then need to figure out a price for the product or service based on costs, competition and earlier testing of the idea to potential customers.

5. Keep Customers Happy. Once there are customers, they need to make sure they keep them happy! The cost to get a new customer is much higher than selling to an existing customer. Happy customers will be the best resource for getting new customers. Have them make a plan for staying in contact with their customers and making sure they are happy.

6. Parent Approval and Legal Stuff. If you aren’t the parent reading this, make sure they check with their parents to make sure that the business idea is okay to put into action. Also check to see if any legal permits are needed. Each state, city & town has their own rules so it is always a good idea to check and see what is required. There may be free or reduced legal resources at your local business center or university or college so you might want to check on that.

7. Create a Plan. Now that the business idea figured out, have them create a plan that will guide them. A marketing plan for how they are going to get the word out and an operational plan for business activities. The two plans will work together to help them schedule their time and resources.

These 7 steps will give kids a great start for getting their business going. If you would like to order a complete Step-by-Step guide including free downloadable worksheets. My e-book You’re Never Too Young to Start a Business is available on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE to ORDER If you would like more information on cultivating young entrepreneurs, visit eseedling.com and sign up for our email list for additional tips, discounts and announcements.

Bio: Julie Ann Wood is the author of More Than a Lemonade Stand and Creator of the Biz Ops Game™. She has been teaching young entrepreneurs since 2008 and created the More Than a Lemonade Stand curriculum for young entrepreneurs to help others teach youth entrepreneurship without reinventing the wheel!

Girl Looking at Goldfish

What do Mini-Lessons & Goldfish Have in Common?

Girl Looking at Goldfish

Girl Looking at Goldfish

Mini-Lesson Mondays for Young Entrepreneurs – Are they the wave of the future?

You may have heard that the focus of a human being has been compared to that of a goldfish.

In a recent article by a colleague of mine, Jenna Atkinson, in our local business magazine (In Business Magazine) quoted that  Time magazine published an article called, “You Now Have a Shorter Attention Span Than a Goldfish.” It reported on how an increasingly digital lifestyle has reduced the average person’s attention span from 12 seconds in the year 2000 to eight seconds in 2015.

The average attention span of a goldfish? Nine seconds. Scary right?! 

Then a few months ago, I read an article in HR magazine about how micro-learning is becoming more popular.  The article discusses a company that uses 4 minute videos to teach concepts and the employees can come back and view them as needed.

And then I began to think about my own attention span – I am currently taking an Internet Marketing course that is broken down into small segments of reading and video.  Each lesson’s content is no longer than a few minutes.  In addition to short quizzes, they give you an assignment based on the content you just learned so you can apply it. I really like this type of learning, I can fit it in when I have a few minutes and can come back to it when I need it.

That is why I decided to create Mini-Lessons for Young Entrepreneurs.  Each Monday, I post a short video on my YouTube channel with a new mini-lesson that will help young entrepreneurs come up with a business idea, business name and help them get it up and running.  The videos are short with the majority of them being less than 3 minutes long and each one gives a short assignment to write in their ‘entrepreneur notebook’. If you haven’t checked it out yet, Click HERE for the Mini-Lesson Monday for Young Entrepreneurs Playlist.

I would love to hear what topics you are interested in for Mini-Lesson Monday so please share your ideas by commenting below or emailing me at juliewood@eseedling.com

Have you signed your kids up for camp?

CampsCamp is one my favorite memories from when I was a kid.  I loved staying in a tent or cabin, slurping slushies, singing fun songs around the campfire and learning all kinds of new things by experiencing them first hand.  I loved it so much I became a 4-H camp counselor at age 16, volunteered many times at my sons’ Boy Scout camps and now I am so fortunate to direct and teach youth entrepreneur camps.

Camps are a great way for kids to experience and learn things they may not have the opportunity to in school.  What is interesting to me is that the kids who may not do well in school (sitting at a desk all day) flourish in a camp environment.  Year after year, I see kids come in on Monday morning not showing much self-confidence and by Friday when they are presenting an idea they are passionate about they are glowing with confidence. 

The following is from the American Camp Association Website which pretty much sums up the benefits of camp:

At camp, when children make new friends, explore the world around them, and learn that “I can” is much more powerful than “I can’t”, magic happens. In an environment created just for them, children learn real life skills, develop self-esteem, and gain a sense of independence and community. Whether children are playing, exploring nature, conquering new heights, or becoming part of a camp family, they are creating memories that will last a lifetime – See more at: http://www.acacamps.org/campers-families/because-camp#sthash.44KAY3o4.dpuf

Since school is either out or soon to be out, it’s time to find a camp for your child(ren).  There are camps of every subject possible so there is bound to be something that they are interested in.  Many camps are already full but with some searching you will most likely find something that fits.  That’s what I really like about directing and teaching at Youth Entrepreneur Camps; the business each camper chooses to create takes into account their strengths, interests and talents so it fits everyone!

Since the UW-Madison SBDC Youth Entrepreneur Camp (where I have been the director for the past 8 years) is full and there is a long wait list, I have decided to add an E-Seedling Youth Entrepreneur Camp July 18-21 in Madison.  It is a 4 day (Mon-Thurs) commuter day camp for ages 10-14 (there will be breakouts based on age groups).  It is limited to 16 kids (8:1 instructor ratio) so register now before it’s full!  To find out more about the camp and to register, Click here!

Hope this is the year to start making memories and having fun at summer camp!

videos for young entrepreneurs

My Fave 5 Videos for teaching Young Entrepreneurs

videos for young entrepreneurs

movie theatre marquee

Everyone loves a good video, especially kids!  It’s always amazing to me that they can be somewhat loud and rambunctious and then a video comes on and voila; it’s like magic – they are mesmerized by the world of video, they pay attention and soak it in! That is why when I teach young entrepreneurs (adults seem to like them too), I interweave video with teaching and activities to make for a fun and effective learning environment.  Since I’m getting ready for the summer camp season, I thought I would share my top 5 videos for teaching young entrepreneurs.

 

  1. Entrepreneurs Can Change the World by Grasshopper, The Entrepreneurs Phone Company. (grasshopper.com) https://youtu.be/T6MhAwQ64c0 This video is a great introduction for a discussion on what an entrepreneur is, what they do and how they can make a difference.
  2. Channel One News Teen Entrepreneurs Wrap Up from Channelone.com. https://youtu.be/11bOrQG3xMw . This video is a great intro into the students choosing their own business idea.  It talks about passion, other businesses and the benefits of starting a business as a young entrepreneur.  Channel One News has lots of great information for teens and teachers can use many of the episodes as a fun classroom discussion starter.
  3. Saturday Night Live’s Pizza Eater Video with Melissa McCarthy. http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/pizza-business/n35040 Melissa McCarthy goes to the bank to get a loan for her new business. This humorous video works great as an example for learning the business model canvas.  In addition to being funny it shows that there is one huge flaw in her business idea (how to make revenue). After watching the video, work on the business model canvas as a group and fill in the building blocks based on the pizza eater business.  Here’s more information on the business model canvas if you are not familiar with it: http://www.businessmodelgeneration.com/canvas/bmc
  4. Lemonaire: Youngest Entrepreneur from Umpqua Bank https://youtu.be/5d2V1LYNBeE .This is my all-time favorite video that I use when teaching young entrepreneurs. It was created by Umpqua Bank as a marketing video but includes so many lessons for teaching young entrepreneurs. It works great to use at the beginning of running a team lemonade stand. It’s great to use for a discussion of a business model, how to get money, how to plan and what can happens when things don’t go as planned.
  5. The Home Run from Liberty Mutual (the responsibility project) https://youtu.be/C-3QCgVDQGw . This is a true story of a girl’s baseball team and what happens with the team to win the game. It is a great example of ethics and sportsmanship and works well to start a discussion on business ethics and rules.
  6. BONUS: Life After Death by Powerpoint 2012 by Don McMillan https://youtu.be/MjcO2ExtHso. This is a humorous video is a great example of what not to do in Powerpoint.  If the kids are going to do a presentation this will start a discussion on what you should do. The reason this is not in my top 5 is that it does include the word “hell” and it might not be appropriate for younger kids.

Now it’s your turn – I would love to hear what your favorite videos for teaching young entrepreneurs!  Please share and comment below. 

For more resources on teaching young entrepreneurs visit eseedling.com

What is the Biz Ops Game?

I often get asked what exactly is the Biz Ops Game?  Here is a short video to explain what it is, how it works and what it teaches.

 

 

Young Entrepreneur Lemonade Stand

7 Steps to Start a Kid Business

  1. Young Entrepreneur Lemonade Stand

    7 Steps to Start a kid biz

    Choose a business idea. You can’t start learning about how to start a business if you don’t have an idea. Think about hobbies, interests, what you’ve learned, what you have experience in, what you’re good at what you like to do in your spare time.

  2. Test your idea with potential customers. Entrepreneurs take risks but you can limit how much risk you take by testing your ideas. Ask customers, prospects, friends and family questions about your idea. You can start with whether or not it is a good solution to the problem you are solving and would they pay money for it.
  3. Create a memorable brand and plan your marketing & sales activities. A brand is what your prospect or customer thinks of or feels when they hear your name, see your logo, marketing materials or store. Once you create your brand you need to plan how to get the word out. This will be determined by where your customers are located.
  4. List what you need to start your business and how much money you need to get started. Start-Up Items are the items you need to have before you can start your business. Some examples of start-up items include office supplies and equipment, website, and tools to make your product or provide your service. You may also need to buy some inventory or supplies to make your products. You probably won’t have fixed costs such as rent but it’s good to be aware that these costs exist also. You will then need to figure out a price for your product or service based on costs, competition and your earlier testing.
  5. Keep your Customers Happy. Once you have customers, you need to make sure you keep them happy! The cost to get a new customer is much higher than selling to an existing customer. Happy customers will be your best resource for getting new customers (what is called Word of Mouth Marketing). You will want to make sure you have a plan for staying in contact with your customers and making sure they are happy.
  6. Parent Approval and Legal Stuff. Before going any further, you should always check with your parents to make sure that your business idea is okay to put into action and also check on if any legal permits are needed. Each state, city & town has their own rules so it is always a good idea to check and see what is required. There may be free or reduced legal resources at your local business center or university or college so you might want to check on that.
  7. Create a Plan. Now that you have your business idea figured out, you need to have a plan that will guide you. You need a marketing plan for how you are going to get the word out and an operational plan for business activities. The two plans will work together to help you schedule your time and resources. All of the hard work you have done already will go into a plan – this chapter will help you put it all together so you are ready to go!

These 7 steps will give you a good start for getting a business going. If you would like a complete Step-by-Step guide including free downloadable worksheets. My new e-book You’re Never too Young to Start A Business is available for only $2.99 on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE to ORDER If you would like more information on cultivating young entrepreneurs, visit eseedling.com and sign up for our e-newsletter.

 

Kid Planning a Trip

5 Everyday Opportunities to Teach Entrepreneurship to your Kids

Kid Planning a Trip

Daughter planning a trip

I am an avid reader of ideas for teaching entrepreneurship not only for improving my own teaching of entrepreneurship but also so I can help parents and teachers implement entrepreneurship education in easy and effective ways. Sometimes we forget about the everyday opportunities we have for developing our kids into young entrepreneurs so here are 5 everyday activities that you can use to teach entrepreneurship to your kids.

  1. Getting up in the morning – do you go in their room and wake them up for school? Empower them by picking out an alarm clock and putting the responsibility on them. If they prove that they can be responsible (and keeping their grades up), you might make them a deal that they could use their cell phone as an alarm. After all, will you be there when they get up and get going for college or a job? Be sure to discuss what the consequences are if they don’t get up on time and get going to school. This one thing can teach responsibility and initiative.
  2. Budget for needs and wants – as young as age 9 they should have the skills to develop a budget for some of their expenses. Kids can understand needs and wants by then (even much younger than that) and so they could have a budget for needs and a budget for wants. This is a great way to have kids start learning how much it costs for necessities and learn what you as a parent are doing to provide these necessities for them. Then have them budget for their wants and come up with ideas to earn money for those wants.
  3. Questions or complaints; brainstorm solutions. If your kids are like mine – they ask multiple questions (and complain) every day. How many times have you heard, “I’m bored”, “How come she gets to do that” or “What’s for supper”? Since entrepreneurship is about solving problems, have them list the questions and brainstorm some ideas on how it can be solved. Then have them pitch an idea to you about the solution. This empowers them to come up with a solution and work as a team to put it together. It will also help their team work, negotiation and consensus building skills.
  4. Plan a Trip. Planning a trip is like running a project and entrepreneurs have to plan and manage many projects. Have a discussion of where you might want to go for a family trip (could start small with a weekend getaway). Then have them research hotels (including prices) and activities they want to include. If it’s a bigger trip, they can include airfare and a rental car. They can also come up with an itinerary for the trip. This will give an idea of how much a trip really costs and it will also give them the chance to learn how to research, document and communicate their findings.
  5. Promote their passions. No matter what it is, find out what they like the most and help them develop those skills. Maybe it’s going to cooking class together, or going to sports activity, it will make them feel special and help deepen their passion (and your relationship). If they are truly passionate about something, encourage them to turn it into a business. They can start small, maybe at craft fairs or by teaching kids at school. This way they can see how it goes and make sure they like it. It will give them a taste of entrepreneurship and maybe they will be able to earn money for some of those “Wants”!

For more information, free tips and product discounts on teaching entrepreneurship; subscribe to this blog or opt-in to our e-newsletter on eseedling.com.

What is an Entrepreneur

What is an Entrepreneur?

What is an Entrepreneur

What is an Entrepreneur?

My theory is that you can’t really teach kids how to be an entrepreneur if they don’t know what it is. The hard part is defining what an entrepreneur is! If you Google “What is an Entrepreneur”, you will get 149 million results in a matter of seconds.

The first one listed is the dictionary definition:

en·tre·pre·neur

noun: entrepreneur; plural noun: entrepreneurs

  1. a person who organizes and operates a business or businesses, taking on greater than normal financial risks in order to do so.

 

Here are a few more of the definitions that came up as some of the first search results:

Entrepreneurs know you need to be both a leader and a manager… in that order. They always start with a leader, and then find a manager. “What is an Entrepreneur?” by Ken Krogue, Forbes July 3, 2013

 

An article from Inc.com entitled “What is an entrepreneur anyway?” by Justin Bariso (Nov 28,2014) includes several definitions of an entrepreneur including his personal favorite (which happens to be my favorite of the article also): Rory MccGwire (founder of The Marketing Donut): “An entrepreneur is someone who, rather than working 8 hours a day for someone else, would prefer to work 18 hours a day for [him or herself]. (And one can then embellish it with half-the-pay, twice the stress, but ten times the fun, etc.)” The article also discusses whether or not if all business owners are actually entrepreneurs which I tend to think they are.”

One of my favorites is from Entrepreneur.com: Who is an Entrepreneur by Juan Jose de la Torre on April 29,2015; He includes many traits but ends up with I think is the real key:Passion is the real drive:There is another element that really dwells at the center of any entrepreneur: passion! An entrepreneur possesses an interior fuel and stamina that drives his or her actions; this superior energy helps to overtake and surpass the different challenges and it injects strength to continue pursuing goals when difficulties arise. Anyone can be an entrepreneur and behave like one- regardless of whether or not they happen to be an equity holder. Ultimately, it’s all about the attitude when running the show.”

This is a great start but since there are 149 million results it tells us that it is not quite that easy to define! That is why “What is an Entrepreneur” is what I start with when I’m teaching young entrepreneurs – how can you teach them to be one if they don’t know what an entrepreneur is.

To introduce what an entrepreneur is and does, I use a short video from Grasshopper (a virtual phone company) entitled Entrepreneurs Can Change the World:  http://grasshopper.com/idea/  The video includes many points about being an entrepreneur and provides a great base for a discussion of what an entrepreneur is and does. Some of the points in the video include:

Entrepreneurs can be anyone

Anyone can change the world

One person can make a difference

They may start with little or nothing except a brilliant idea

Entrepreneurs Work hard

They see opportunities

They think about how life can better and make it better

Entrepreneurs change the way we see the world

They are innovators, thinkers, doers

Entrepreneurs take risks

They create jobs and fuel growth

Entrepreneurs find new ways to solve problems

In addition to the points in the video, I emphasize that passion and purpose are extremely important (to keep you going when times are tough) and then we go into a discussion of choosing an idea that they can use their own unique talents and skills (I’ll save that for another blog post).

Being an entrepreneur is not just about learning the business skills to run a business (anyone can learn those skills); it is about what an entrepreneur mindset is. They must be able to see opportunities and have the ability to come up with creative solutions. They also need resilience and so when they fail, they can keep on going. In a future post, I will talk about the new Entrepreneurial Strength Finder by Gallup – based on research they state that there are 10 Entrepreneurial Strengths necessary to become a highly successful large scale entrepreneur. I believe that anyone can become an entrepreneur (or I wouldn’t be teaching kids) and that if kids can learn about the possibilities before they even reach high school they will be much more open to learning what is an entrepreneur, developing those entrepreneurial strengths and creating an entrepreneurial mindset so that they can become successful entrepreneurs.

Did you enjoy this post? If so, sign up for my blog updates and share with others. For more resources and tools on teaching youth entrepreneurship and to sign up for my e-newsletter and special promotions visit www.eseedling.com.

Money Business Entrepreneur

There is more than one way to become a Billionaire Entrepreneur

Money Business Entrepreneur

More than one way to Spell Money And Business

In today’s blog post I wanted to share a couple of infographics. The first one features the”10 Youngest Billionaires of Our Time: How Did They Do it?shared with me by one of my readers (thanks Madeline). These young billionaires have done some amazing things and most of us have been affected in one or another by what they have achieved (I mean, who has not been affected by Facebook or what it has done to change social media). You may notice that many of these young billionaires did have an advantage and that in most cases is family money or the means to attend a very prestigious school (could be money could be intelligence) so the question begs – do you have to have that advantage to become a billionaire? Well, I wondered this as I don’t have either (family money or the means to attend Harvard, Stanford, or MIT) and of course who wouldn’t like to become a Billionaire Entrepreneur (or at least a Millionaire)!

So I did a little digging and the good news is there is hope for anyone who wants to work hard, take risks and persevere to become a billionaire entrepreneur!  Sara Blakely who invented Spanx and was added to the billionaire list in 2013, (from as far as I can tell) she was an everyday person who attended a public high school and a State university. She came up with an idea that she believed in. She worked long and hard to research and develop the idea and her entrepreneur road wasn’t easy but she persevered and as we know today the rewards were great. Then I found another infographic that shows what self-made billionaires have in common. The most well-known (for me anyway) was Larry Ellison, the founder of Oracle, who was an orphan, was brought up by relatives on the South Side of Chicago, was not born into money and did not have a college education. He learned computer programming on his own and one of his first jobs had to create a database. He then started Oracle databases, one of the most used database in the world.

Okay so some of the becoming a billionaire usually does require a bit of luck, whether it is being in the right place at the right time, making the right contact or having family money to back you up, but you won’t get there without hard work, perseverance, taking risks and belief in your idea. So get going on developing your idea and developing yourself as an entrepreneur (you are not getting any younger)!

Sources: 10 Youngest Billionaire Infographic: Masters-in-Accounting.org; Sara Blakely story: spanx.com; Self-made billionaires’ infographic; entrepreneur.com; Larry Ellison story: businessinsider.com.

If you would like to learn more about entrepreneurship education and cultivating tomorrow’s entrepreneurs – subscribe to my e-newsletter and visit my website at www.eseedling.com.